Spain 😷 Kids First Time Outside After 6 weeks of Strict Coronavirus Lockdown 🤗 Family-Friendly Video

“We’re FREEEEEEEE!”, my kids cried out with glee!  After six weeks or 43 days of strict coronavirus lockdown here in Spain, it’s the children’s first time outside to play. That’s 23 hours in the house and one outside, and maybe only for good behavior, I’d like to add. Here’s a short video of what our boys did on this first day of their newfound “FREEDOM”, roaming the historic center of a little-big town called Jerez de la Frontera, Cadiz province, Andalucia on their bicycles.

Spain 😷 Kids First Time Outside After 6 weeks of Strict Coronavirus Lockdown 🤗 Family Friendly Video

On 25 April the Spanish government eased restrictions to allow kids under 14 years of age to have a “paseo” or a walk about for one hour a day between 9 in the morning and 9 in the evening.

However, we can only roam about within one kilometer of our home and only with one of us (parent). Playgrounds are off limits still.

Two young boys ifar in the distance of an open square of the Alameda Vieja, Alcazar, Jerez de la Frontera during coronavirus lockdown in Spain.

www.FreeElectrons.Family
First day of freedom at the Alameda Vieja, Alcazar, Jerez de la Frontera. This is also what it looks like everyday during siesta! 🙂

This is the Spanish government’s first step in the loosening of restrictions due to the corona virus. If the infection rate continues to fall and all goes well, we expect to have more and more “freedom” every two weeks or so.

Stay safe and sane. . . especially you parents! 🙂😷

Two young boys on bicycles in a small plaza/square, Plaza Plateros, Jerez de la Frontera during coronavirus lockdown in Spain.

www.FreeElectrons.Family
Day 43 of coronavirus lockdown in Spain on the normally bustling small plaza/square of Plaza Plateros (Jerez) to enjoy tapas, drinks and the art of Andalusian chit-chat.

Here’s what you can see on the video of the town center of the land of sherry, flamenco and dancing horses–Jerez de la Frontera.

Panoramic view of Plaza Asuncion, Jerez.
Panoramic view of Plaza Asuncion, source: De Jerezplataforma – Trabajo propio, CC BY 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=11149542
Two young boys on bicycles on a square, Plaza Plateros, Jerez de la Frontera during coronavirus lockdown in Spain.

www.FreeElectrons.Family
Plaza Asuncion with the closed-off benches in the perimeter for the cancelled “Semana Santa” (Holy Week/Easter) processions in Jerez de la Frontera, Spain.
  • Plaza San Miguel with the iconic, gothic-rennaisance-era Iglesia (Church) San Miguel that marks the traditionally flamenco Barrio San Miguel;
  • Plaza Arenal with a man on a horse full of birds pooping on top of him, surrounded by water fountains that make up the main city square;
  • Calle (street) Juderia of the the old Jewish quarter heading towards the old casco historico (historic center);
  • Plaza Plateros (silversmiths) that sits at the crossroads of the longest running commercial street of Jerez. It is a small plaza with an open-air ambience and normally one of the busiest nightlife. Overlooking the plaza is the Tower of Atalaya–a 15th century watch tower connected (behind it) to the gothic-mudejar Church of San Dionisio;
  • Plaza Asuncion that is the center of Barrio San Dionisio (with the aforementioned church of the same name). This square is often the host to a lot of activities here in Jerez, from puppet theaters, concerts, and reserved seating arrangements for Easter processions;
  • The old town hall built in 1575 located in one of the most beautiful pedestrian streets in Jerez;
  • The Alcazar and Alameda Vieja with its orange groves whose decorative fruits hang until January and the majestic purple flowers bloom of the Jacaranda trees in April/May;
  • Then, finally back up towards Iglesia San Miguel via Calle Santa Cecilia. How do processional floats of Jesus and Mary make it up through this narrow slightly uphill street during Easter processions?

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